Tag Archives: FTD

How to “Redirect” an Alzheimer’s Patient: Caregiver Tips

28 Feb

joindefeatdementiaHow do you “redirect” a dementia patient who wants to “go home” or  speak to someone who is no longer alive? How do you respond to a loved one who is living in a reality which isn’t yours? Here are a few tips that I posted yesterday on  Defeat Dementia, a Facebook group which provides information and support to caregivers of dementia patients:

• Don’t worry about convincing her that her loved one has already passed away, but to pay attention to the emotion she is expressing.

• Sometimes it is helpful to encourage the patient to talk about her loved one. Try questions like “what did you do with your (mom) when you were little?”, “What do you want to say to your (mom)?”

• Perhaps having a photo of her loved one available that you can look at together, ask her to tell a story about her loved one, might be strategies that would satisfy her.

• If necessary, some caregivers have tried a white lie, like “Your (mother) lives someplace else now.” or “I can’t take you there today. Maybe tomorrow.”

• It’s helpful to try to stay in the patient’s reality, and the death of her loved one is no longer a part of her reality, so saying her (mother) is dead only confuses her.

Source: UCSF Memory and Aging Center

For more information, visit the Defeat Dementia website, join our Facebook Group, visit the UCSF Memory and Aging Channel on YouTube, or check out UCSF’s Memory and Aging Center website.

The New Era of Personal Charity

27 Dec

In the  post-Madoff  meltdown, is the face of philanthropy changing? Lucette Lagnado's thinks maybe so according to her  article in yesterday's Wall Street Journal"When the Big Spenders Fail, Who Will Save Jewish Charity?" Ms Lagnado points out that over the past two decades, Jewish charities were receiving more money, but from fewer donors. But today she says,  this trend might reverse itself– funding may go from the hands of the few to the power of many –what she calls "communal philanthropy" — and if that's the case, she doesn't think that's so bad. 

Here's my favorite quote from the article: 

"…in our post-Madoff universe I find myself longing for tzedakah,  or personal charity, that took place before the rise of the uber-Jewish foundations and zillionaire philanthropists…It would be lovely to see the return of little checks — the donations everyone could afford to give and often did…"

Are we moving to a Web 2.0 model of giving? I immediately thought of Facebook's "Groups" and "Causes" enabling millions of members around the world — of all types of financial means — to join and contribute to causes and charities they care most about.   The Defeat Dementia Facebook Group,   for example, connects caregivers, family, friends, and others who support one another in the fight against neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, CJD and FTD.   The New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care Group  helps support the underserved ill in NYC through chaplaincy work and training, contemplative care educational retreats, and outreach programs. Both are notable groups — please join.


Hoping that each one of us gives back in some way big or small in the New Year ahead.


Defeat Dementia, Know More Now

12 Jun
Join me and my colleagues at UCSF in the fight against neurodegenerative diseases  such as Alzheimer’€™s disease (AD),  Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and others.

The UCSF Memory and Aging Center is at the forefront of discovering causes, treatments and cures of dementia.The Defeat Dementia campaign seeks to help educate the public by generating broader national awareness of dementias.

Our hope is that increased public awareness will lead to early detection among patients, caregivers and health professionals and more participation in research and clinical trials.

Please grab and share this  Defeat Dementia widget with your friends, family, physicians, colleagues and others who may be interested in joining our public outreach campaign.

For more information, please visit our  Defeat Dementia Facebook Group and the  UCSF Memory and Aging Center. You can also visit our UCSF Memory and Aging Center YouTube Channel.