Tag Archives: aimee levine

UCSF Links with Patients, Donors via YouTube | San Francisco Business Times

3 May
At the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), I developed and deployed one of the first uses of social media among academic medical institutions to drive clinical trials outreach and caregiver support. The following article (where I am quoted) is about the social media campaign I developed on behalf of the Memory and Aging Center.

UCSF is changing how it tells its story, says Levine.

The University of California, San Francisco, is using a new YouTube channel and a Facebook group to communicate with patients, concerned family members, physicians and — just as important — potential donors, as it begins to explore the brave new world of social networking.

And other local hospitals are beginning to move in the same direction.

UCSF’s new YouTube channel incorporates videos about Alzheimer’s, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and other forms of dementia that were produced by its Memory and Aging Center. The move is seen as a first step in exploring new ways of communicating with external audiences and finding potential participants in clinical trials. But another key goal is reaching out to Silicon Valley’s huge pool of potential philanthropists, as UCSF starts to gear up to raise $500 million in donations for its planned women’s, children’s and cancer hospital at Mission Bay, and another $1.5 billion for other capital projects.

“From a marketer’s perspective, the world is changing,” said Aimee Levine, UCSF’s assistant vice chancellor for public affairs. “The way we tell our story needs to change, to reach different audiences.”

And UCSF isn’t alone.

Obadiah Greenberg, YouTube’s strategic partnership manager for academic institutions, said universities nationwide are beginning to make similar moves, including UC Berkeley and Stanford University locally, and Duke University, the University of Wisconsin and the Mayo Clinic further afield. “But what I seeing UCSF doing is remarkable. They’re so focused on specific diseases and specific audiences.”

Stanford and its School of Medicine have about 150 videos posted on YouTube, and Stanford Hospital & Clinics plans to add others this fall, said hospital spokesman Gary Migdol. Like UCSF, Stanford has massive capital projects under way, including a $2 billion expansion and upgrade of the neighboring Stanford and Lucile Packard Children’s hospitals.

“We’re not currently using any of those (Internet) sites,” said Amelia Alverson, Stanford Hospital’s vice president of development, “but we are exploring opportunities in various types of new media.”

Steve Mangold, president and chief operating officer of PRx Inc., a San Jose-based public relations, marketing and branding firm, said use of social networking media is more common among nonprofit groups that focus on a specific disease than hospitals. “There’s a reluctance among many health-care organizations to invite a lot of public comment,” he said, “because you have to vet the information you put online.”

Even so, PRx client Santa Clara Valley Medical Center is using YouTube to enhance communications with patients, family members and potential donors, and has been doing so for nearly a year. The cash-strapped hospital — Santa Clara County’s public hospital and primary trauma center — took the step because its nonprofit fund-raising arm, the Valley Medical Center Foundation, “took a chance” on YouTube and other new media to spread the word about the hospital’s services and other health tips, said Chris Wilder, the foundation’s executive director.

In terms of philanthropic outreach, “mostly it’s seeding the ground, but we have received a few donations from people who have seen our videos,” Wilder said.

Levine, meanwhile, said UCSF is pleased with the attention it’s garnering on the new YouTube channel, Facebook and various Silicon Valley blogs, and predicts that its nascent social-networking campaign is destined to grow.

“YouTube is a great aggregator of audiences, but it’s also viral,” she said. “People take links from YouTube and put it on their sites, and imbed it on their blogs,” giving the message broader reach.

A big part of the new strategy is “generating awareness for the brand and supporting our donor efforts,” Levine added. She said UCSF needs to cast a wider net to find philanthropic givers, in the region, Silicon Valley as well as in Fresno (where UCSF has an affiliated medical education program), Palm Springs and other potential hot spots for wealthy donors.

More than $7 million has already been raised to fight Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease as part of the “Fight for Mike” — Silicon Valley tech marketing guru Mike Homer, who was diagnosed with the deadly disease last year. Homer, and his volunteer “Fight” group, helped inspire UCSF to use the web to spread information about CJD and other diseases, as well as mobilize funding and research. About $200,000 of that CJD funding was used to create a web site, in conjunction with the YouTube channel, that can serve as a template for other disease-specific dementia-related sites.

crauber@bizjournals.com / (415) 288-4946

 

The Original iPad – a Must Have?

4 Aug

credit: AFP

Martin Giles, US Tech Correspondent for The Economist, wrote about how Apple continues to persuade consumers that an iPad or tablet is a must have. In First Impressions of the iPad he wrote that “Apple’s gizmo will help to convince people everywhere that there is indeed a place for tablet computers in their future as a third device that sits between mobile phones and personal computers.”

Giles interviewed me after I purchased my iPad at the Best Buy store on Harrison Street in San Francisco on April 3. Giles writes

Several of the folk at that store with iPads under their arms seemed to be Apple aficionados already. Aimee Levine, a self-confessed “gadget girl” who already owns an iPhone and iPod music player, said one of the main reasons for buying an iPad was that she planned to take out electronic subscriptions to her favourite newspapers and magazines on it, and to do away with the printed ones.

UCSF Connects with Patients, Donors Via Social Media

6 Jul

At the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), I developed and deployed one of the first uses of social media among academic medical institutions to drive clinical trials outreach and caregiver support. You can read the San Francisco Business Times article where I’m interviewed about my pioneering campaign here.

First Impressions of the iPad: Launch pad | The Economist

19 Apr
I am quoted in the following Economist article  about the launch of the original iPad.

Apple’s iPad will help persuade consumers that a tablet is a must-have

Apr 4th 2010 | SAN FRANCISCO | From The Economist online

GIVEN all the hype ahead of the arrival of Apple’s new tablet computer, the debut on April 3rd of the iPad in America was perhaps inevitably going to feel like something of an anti-climax. There were long lines at the company’s stores before daybreak and, as the doors opened, would-be buyers were met with rapturous applause from Apple staff. But many reports suggested that by mid-morning the fervour had died down in most places. At the Apple store in San Francisco late on Saturday afternoon, it almost felt like any other shopping day—except, that is, for the small scrum that had formed around the table where iPads were being tested. The company later said it had sold over 300,000 on the first day, around the middle of the range of analysts’ expectations.

The devices on sale this week are WiFi-only iPads; many people will be waiting for the mobile-wireless ones that are due to go on sale in late April. Moreover, customers were able to order iPads online from mid-March for home delivery beginning April 3rd, which meant they didn’t need to traipse to a store. And Apple agreed to let Best Buy, a big electronics retailer, offer iPads on the same day as its own stores, which siphoned off some traffic from Apple’s outlets. Your correspondent was able to pick up his own iPad from a Best Buy store mid-morning without even having to queue for it.

Several of the folk at that store with iPads under their arms seemed to be Apple aficionados already. Aimee Levine, a self-confessed “gadget girl” who already owns an iPhone and iPod music player, said one of the main reasons for buying an iPad was that she planned to take out electronic subscriptions to her favourite newspapers and magazines on it, and to do away with the printed ones. Jeremy Moore, another customer, said he was keen to get his hands on something that had the potential to reshape computing. “If it makes me feel like I’m in the future I’ll buy it.”

Consumers may buy a tablet as a “third device”, between mobile phones and personal computers

Apple will be hoping that when customers try the iPad it really does feel like a quantum leap in personal computing. Your correspondent has only had a few hours to play with the new device, but his initial impressions are that Apple’s gizmo will help to convince people everywhere that there is indeed a place for tablet computers in their future as a “third device” that sits between mobile phones and personal computers.

Among other things, the new iPad boasts a beautiful touchscreen that portrays images in deep, rich colours; simple controls that make it very easy to navigate around the device; and a specially designed chip that means most programs run at lightning speeds. Games such as Flight Control and videos from YouTube ran smoothly, and the quality of the sound produced by the iPad’s speakers was impressive. Although the on-screen keyboard isn’t ideal for extended typing—which explains why Apple is offering a plug-in version—it was perfectly adequate for dashing off emails and Facebook posts.

Tablets and e-readers will mean big disruption for the publishing business

Then there is the iBooks app, which lets users download texts from Apple’s iBookstore. These look amazing on screen and, together with the slick page-turning capabilities of the iPad, they suggest that the days of the single-purpose, black and white e-reader such as Amazon’s Kindle are numbered. Quite how long it takes for publishers to adapt to this new regime remains unclear, but both the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal had apps available on the day that the new device appeared.

Much will depend not just on the iPad itself, but also on the way in which Apple develops a new “ecosystem” around it so that the company’s hardware is complemented by enough fancy software to make buying a package of both a compelling one. Many iPhone apps have already been revised to fit a bigger screen and others are being developed to take advantage of it. What seems certain, as we have reported, is that for good or ill, tablets will bring big disruption to the publishing business.

The Apple iPad: a Must Have as a Third Device?

4 Apr

Martin Giles, US Tech Correspondent for The Economist, writes in today's online edition about how Apple is trying to persuade consumers that an iPad or tablet is a must have. In First Impressions of the iPad he says that he had "only had a few hours to play with the new device, but his initial impressions are that Apple’s gizmo will help to convince people everywhere that there is indeed a place for tablet computers in their future as a “third device” that sits between mobile phones and personal computers."

Giles interviewed me after I purchased my iPad at the Best Buy store on Harrison Street in San Francisco on April 3. Giles writes "several of the folk at that store with iPads under their arms seemed to be Apple aficionados already. Aimee Levine, a self-confessed “gadget girl” who already owns an iPhone and iPod music player, said one of the main reasons for buying an iPad was that she planned to take out electronic subscriptions to her favourite newspapers and magazines on it, and to do away with the printed ones."

 IPadphoto
Photo: AFP


The Next Wave of Social Media

4 Jul

Daisy Whitney’s New Media Minute features our Defeat Dementia YouTube
Channel as an example of the next wave of social media use. We’re at the beginning of a new trend…she claims that we are
“now seeing public service efforts, educational efforts demonstrate the
future direction of the business.”

You can watch it here.

O’Brien: Harnessing social media to find cure

4 Jul

UCSF uses YouTube channel, Facebook group and widget as part of integrated Defeat Dementia campaign. "The UCSF partnership, however, is particularly laudable because its impact could be much more profound: These efforts could have a tangible impact on the race to find a cure."

read more | digg story